Helping The Cause, Gaining A Friend

-Written by Erik Sargent

A life without pets is a life many people could not imagine, as animals have become integral members of families all around the globe.

The joy a dog or cat can bring to every member in a household can’t be measured, and the love people have for their animals has no limits. Unfortunately, many of these animals are reliant on living in animal shelters to stay alive, and they miss out on the style of life that is fit for them.

That’s why the people here at TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® have taken the initiative to help these animals in need, and how the Movers for Mutts program began. Each fall, the program partners with local businesses, schools, and organizations across the country to collect food, toys, and other items pets may need.

The program – like all TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® community service programs – has been a great success, and has brought joy to both the animals and the people involved. With these events, new relationships have developed, and many employees from TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® that went in to help walked away with a new friend.

Here are a few of those great stories of TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® employees walking away with a new pet after participating in Movers for Mutts.

Jessica Chapman – Marketing Specialist – Akron, Ohio

Working out of the Akron franchise, Jessica was on her way to a local animal shelter to drop of flyers for the upcoming Movers for Mutts event. What started as a work-related trip ended with a new member at her home.first-sight

“I had no clue I would be getting a fluffy puppy this year. I went to the shelter to drop off some flyers for our event, and I walked out with a fur baby,” Chapman said. “After the first time I held him, I knew I couldn’t put him down. We’ve had Bentley for three weeks and he’s been on three trips, so it’s a good thing he likes to travel.”

Bentley was an unexpected surprise for Jessica, but he’s a good example of how TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® community service events like Movers for Mutts can make a major impact.

“Bentley is a perfect example of how Movers for Mutts can change an animal’s life,” Chapman said. “I wasn’t planning on getting a dog, but I was at the rescue for Movers for Mutts, and now Bentley has a home he can feel safe to be a puppy in.”

Jenni Hargrove – Marketing Director – Nashville, Tenn.

Jenni was a part of the Movers for Mutts at the Nashville franchise, and going in, had absolutely no intention of adopting a pet, she already had a dog of her own.movers-for-muttes-leela

“I definitely did not want to adopt a pet before the event. We had a dog already and lived in an apartment, so I didn’t want to adopt another dog until we moved into a house,” Hargove said.

Despite her intentions not to adopt, a certain puppy – Leela – was determined to get her attention, and it paid off for both.

“We met Leela at the event and she actually wouldn’t stop jumping into my lap every time I had to sit down to do something,” Hargrove said. “She was really energetic and sociable, just like our other dog, so I asked my husband to drive home and get our 3-year-old dog so they could meet.”

The meet and greet with their other dog went well, and Leela was on her way to her new home.

Anissa Manuel – Sales and Marketing Coordinator – Virginia Beach, Va.

Anissa works for the Virginia Beach franchise, and this year decided to make some donations to a local animal shelter to help support the Movers for Mutts campaign. She didn’t have any plans of adopting a dog, but a text message from a friend changed her mind.babzoe

“I was talking to my friend who volunteers at the shelter, I was telling her about Movers for Mutts, and that I was going to donate our items to that shelter in particular,” Manuel said. “She texted me about puppies, and I ran right there after work.”

Anissa was helping donate to the Movers for Mutts cause, and soon after, ended up meeting her new friend, Zoe.

“I adopted a sweet little puppy named Zoe. She’s about two months old,” Manuel said. “I love my Zoe, she’s a handful – which is to be expected – but she’s sure the cutest and happiest dog I’ve ever met.”

Kristin Touart – Marketing Manager – Alpharetta, Ga.

Kristin works out of the Alpharetta franchise in Georgia, and unlike the three others in this story, walked away with a new pet that wasn’t a dog.jax

“I had no idea or plans at all, it was random and spontaneous,” Touart said. “I was at a vet partner location to drop off boxes and flyers and one thing lead to another, and I ended up with a kitten.”

The kitten was a welcomed addition to Kristin’s family, as her daughter has taken kindly to the new furry friend in the house. Kristin is big on animal rights and has a soft spot for animals, and she was glad to make a difference in the kitten’s life.

“I’m happy I was able to give one kitten a home and make room for another homeless animal to take his place,” Touart said. “Serving our community is a way for us to share our success and resources with others. It’s a fun way to live out our core values and that shows the public what TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® is all about!”

 

To learn more about the Movers for Mutts program and how you can get involved, visit our community service page. TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® is committed to supporting the communities we proudly serve. TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® is the first and largest franchised moving company in the U

First time moving with pets? We’ve got you covered!

Moving to a new home can be a very stressful time for our four-legged family members. Here are some great tips to minimize stress before the move, during the transition, and when arriving at your new home.

Get the 411: If moving to a foreign country (or even Hawaii), be aware of quarantine or travel requirements that may take additional planning. If moving within the US, familiarize yourself with local pet regulations, ordinances, and zoning laws. Many cities have specific laws regarding leashes, pet licensing, breed restrictions, and allowable number of pets per household. In fact, some cities will even issue a citation for walking your dog on a public beach. For exotic pets (birds, Dr2reptiles, monkeys) or agricultural species (pigs, chickens, and goats), special permitting or zoning laws may apply. If you will be residing within an apartment community or condo, you should double check to ensure your pets are permitted. This should also be plainly stipulated within your rental agreement or within the homeowner’s association rules.

Good to go: Prior to moving, plan a visit with your pet’s veterinarian to ensure your pet is up-to-date on important vaccinations and is healthy enough for travel. Remember to obtain sufficient medication and prescription diet to last at least two weeks (until you are able to establish a relationship with a veterinarian in your new area). Ask your current veterinarian to refer you to a veterinarian in your new area or conduct your own research using the AVMA or American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) websites. If you are traveling across state lines or internationally, you will need a corresponding certificate of veterinary inspection to be filled out by an accredited veterinarian. In addition, some airlines require an acclimation certificate for air travel that must also be signed by an accredited veterinarian. Request a copy of your pet’s medical records to share with your new veterinarian. Consider having your pet microchipped as a quick and minimally invasive way to locate your pet if he or she should ever become lost. If your pet is already microchipped, remember to update your new information with the microchip company.

Carry me home: Leave yourself enough time to find a suitable pet carrier with sufficient ventilation. Your pet should have enough room to stand up, turn around, and lie down comfortably. Get your pet accustomed to the carrier before you travel by using the carrier as a pet bed for several days to weeks. Try to increase comfort and security by placing your pet’s favorite blanket, toy, and/or treat within the carrier. If your pet is prone to motion sickness, consider trying to slowly acclimate him or her by taking short car trips well in advance of your move. Progressively increase the duration of the car trips and monitor for improvement. Also, ask your veterinarian about prescription medications that work well to alleviate motion sickness in pets.

Pack it up:  Shortly before your move, your pet may become anxious while witnessing the packing and moving of household items. Consider a doggy day care, boarding facility, or have your pet visit a well-known friend during times of increased activity. Alternatively, assign a well-ventilated room of your home as the “pet room” to provide a sanctuary away from the chaos. Place a “do not disturb” sign on the door to avoid people unnecessarily entering the room.  Keep in mind that cats may show a tendency to run away or hide in boxes when stressed, so a “pet room” will help to keep tabs on your tiny tiger. Avoid straying from your usual routine during the moving process. Extra attention and special treats can serve as good short-term distractions while extra walks/increased exercise are a great outlet for excess nervous energy.  Pheromone-based diffusers and sprays are also available to help calm dogs and cats during stressful times. If you are concerned about your pet’s level of anxiety, speak to your veterinarian about medications available to help control your pet’s anxiety throughout the moving process.

Leave it out: Remember to leave out the following pet-related items that are needed for travel:
Prescribed medications (ensure you have adequate supply for the entire duration of your trip plus an additional 4 days)
-Food and water (ensure you have adequate supply for the entire duration of your trip plus an additional 4 days)
-Travel carrier or crate
-Pet bed with favorite blanket
-Several favorite toysDr

-Collar with leash or harness; ensure your pet is wearing an updated information tag including your pet’s name, new phone number, and new address
-Litter pan/cat litter
-Health certificate (interstate or international) +/- acclimation certificate for air travel
-Photo of your pet (in case your pet should become lost)
-Plastic poop bags
-Roll of paper towels

-Current veterinarian’s phone number

Other items to consider:
Medical records (especially if your pet has a current medical condition)
Pet first aid kit
Favorite treats
Pet seat belt and/or vehicle barrier
Pet brush

Dr. Anna Ligman is a small animal veterinarian and owner of The Veterinary Center at Hunter’s Crossing in Gainesville, FL.  Dr. Ligman is very passionate about preventative medicine and focuses on strong client education to enhance pets’ quality – and quantity – of life.

Tips for Moving with Pets

Written by Claire Schneider

Moving with petsMoving is a big life event for the whole family, even for our beloved four-legged friends. When changes are made to their living environment, pets can become uncomfortable and stressed. They may seem anxious and nervous during the packing stages of moving because they don’t know what is happening. They likely have developed separation anxiety from past vacations and other stays away from their owners. Many animals, especially dogs, are known to be emotional and to have a natural fear of abandonment.

Premove prep

Because of the attachment to their owners, it is always prudent to pay special attention to pets early in the process. If possible, give them comfort by taking them to visit the new home before the actual move to familiarize them with their new surroundings.

Prior to moving day, pet owners who make a little extra effort on their furry friend’s behalf will be rewarded with a less anxious animal. Just being aware of your pet’s feelings, just as you would your child’s, will give him a sense of peace amid the managed chaos the day is sure to present. Giving pets as much affection as possible will also reassure them they are still being cared for.

“Moving is very stressful for a family,” said ASPCA President Larry Hawk, D.V.M. “That stress is also experienced by the pets. They want to know that they’re part of the family and that they’ll be going, too.”

Moving can be especially stressful for cats since they are more focused on their surroundings and don’t adapt easily to change. Disruption to their environment can cause them anxiety which may lead to behavior changes. The best thing you can do is to plan a moving strategy which creates the least amount of noticeable change.

If your animals are anything like mine, they tend to get nervous at the first sign of packing, even if it is just an overnight bag for a quick trip away. To reduce their stress, spread out your packing over several weeks and start packing rooms pets usually stay out of to keep packed boxes and belongings out of sight.

A few weeks before moving day, plan a visit to the vet. This is an ideal opportunity for a quick check-up and to ensure records are up-to-date; I recommend asking for a copy of their veterinary records. If necessary, you may also ask if they have any recommendations for veterinary clinics in your new town; you can research online reviews to select your new provider.

Moving day

Moving with petsIf you hired movers, let your pet get to know them before they start moving your items. Animals are very territorial and may be hesitant to welcome strangers into their home. Give the movers some time to introduce themselves to your pet by slowly petting them. Having treats handy for the movers to dole out is a surefire way to get fast acquainted with any cat or dog.

Has a family member been assigned to caring for the family pet on moving day? This could be one of your children, a friend, or family member. To ensure their safety, put animals in a blocked off area (using a baby gate or boxes) so they become a spectator of the action yet safely out of the fray. Putting them in an isolated room could cause them further stress since they know something is happening yet can’t see it. Make sure they have food, water and, of course, their favorite toys to keep them occupied.

When packing up the car, leave plenty of room for your animals. By giving them ample space, they will be more comfortable and relaxed during the drive to their new home.

Hitting a high note in the new home

Immediately introduce your pet to the new surroundings, allowing them to explore each room.  Don’t rush them. Bring in their food and water dishes, along with their toys, to make them more contented. To help with the adjustment, place familiar items in locations similar to the old house—at least for a period of time. Also, follow their current routines; they have had enough changes already.

Invest a little time in planning ahead for your furry and four-legged friends, and the move will be less stressful for your whole family.

Here are some helpful tips for moving with specific animals:

Cats:

• Before and after the move, surround your cat with familiar objects ― feeding and water bowls, toys, blanket, or bed. If you are using a crate, leave it in a place with which they can become familiar.

• Since cats are very sensitive to their environment, gradually introduce them to their surroundings by restricting them to one or two rooms at the onset.

Dogs:

• Like cats, dogs should be slowly introduced to their surroundings, then leashed outside until comfortable with the area.

• If you are unable to stay home the first few days following a move, consider arranging a friend or pet sitter to visit a couple of hours a day to ease your dog’s anxiety and to burn some healthy energy.

Fish:

• Traveling is the most difficult part of the moving process for fish. Place fish in bags with a mix of new water and clean water directly from their aquarium. The less the fish are crowded the better. Put rubber bands around the tops of bags and place the bags inside a dark, insulated cooler.

• Let the filter run for a few hours before returning your fish to their tank, and try to limit their time away from their normal habitat to less than 48 hours.

Birds:

• Use appropriate-sized carriers for birds and cover the bottom with litter. Remember to secure carrier doors with a clip from the outside. Keep the birds cool and protected from the sun at all times.

• Transport a supply of food and water from the previous house, then gradually switch from old to new supplies.

Small pets:

• Small pets such as gerbils, guinea pigs, and hamsters are more sensitive to drastic temperature changes. Take care to protect them from cold drafts or direct sunlight.

• These animals can travel in the cage they normally live in, but make sure it is well sealed so they cannot escape.

TWO MEN AND A TRUCK® is the first and largest franchised moving company in the United States. Let us help move you forward! For more helpful tips and information on moving services subscribe to our blog and like us on Facebook.